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Kaijun Lu

Like cracking a code of hieroglyphics, chemists decipher the previously secret structure of matter

September 26, 2018

By Sally Palmer

Several thousands of years ago, when the pharaohs ruled ancient Egypt, organic matter in the oceans like seagrass and by products of fish waste created during their time is just now breaking down and transferred back into the atmosphere.

Dissolved organic matter is one of the most stable sources of carbon there is and it can take several thousands of years to breakdown. Chemists at The University of Texas Marine Science Institute recently made a ground-breaking discovery about the shape and structure of this ancient type of carbon. In a

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Meredith Evans Seeley accepts the James D. Watkins Award for research excellence

Grad Student Seeley Investigates the Longevity of Toxic Oil Compounds in Coastal Environments

August 8, 2018

Oil is a complex mixture of chemicals with different degradation behaviors and toxicity levels. Understanding how the compounds in spilled oil, particularly toxic compounds, change with weathering is important to predicting oil’s persistence in the environment. Meredith Evans Seeleyanalyzed how oil compounds are preserved or removed over time in coastal systems that have different hydrographic activity levels. Her research will help

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Oil Plus Dispersants May Lead to More Red Tide Events

August 7, 2018

By Sally Palmer - The University of Texas Marine Science Institute

Harmful algal blooms, or red tides, can occur naturally, but new research indicates that after an oil spill, the application of dispersant may increase the chance of red tides. A new paper recently released in Environmental Science and Technologyprovides experimental evidence that oil and dispersant applications may open up a hole in the food web that toxic bloom-forming algae take the opportunity to fill.

When an oil spill occurs, they can disproportionally kill the single-

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Liana Vaccari

Recent DROPPS PhD graduate Liana Vaccari receives Christine Mirzayan Science & Technology Policy Graduate Fellowship on Ocean Studies Board

December 18, 2017

Liana Vaccari, a recent DROPPS graduate who receieved a PhD in Chemical and Biomedical Engineering from the University of Pennsylvania (UPENN), was awarded the Christine Mirzayan Science & Technology Policy Graduate 2018 Fellowship. Liana will serve on the the Ocean Studies Board starting in January 2018. 

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Helen Schawe

Impressive high school senior joins DROPPS lab to analyze bacterial compositions in the Gulf with sophisticated new equipment

December 13, 2017
Impressive high school senior joins DROPPS lab to analyze bacterial compositions in the Gulf with sophisticated new equipment
By Lalitha Asirvadam
 
High school senior Helen Schawe from Veterans Memorial High School in Corpus Christi, TX, is working on some exciting new research in Dr. Jian Sheng’s lab at Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi. Dr. Sheng is a Co-Principal Investigator in the Dispersion Research on Oil: Physics and Plankton Studies (DROPPS) consortia within the Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative. DROPPS is
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Scientists Awarded $50 Million to Study Effects of Oil on Gulf of Mexico Ecosystem

September 21, 2017

The Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative (GoMRI) is pleased to announce the 31 awardees of the program’s final two-year grants to support research on effects of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. The selected proposals underwent a competitive peer review process similar to that used by the U.S. National Science Foundation. Approximately $35 million will go to eight Research Consortia and

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Word Cloud by David Murphy

Study Analyzes Trends and Gaps in Oil Spill Literature Since 1968

April 25, 2017

 

Researchers surveyed oil spill studies between 1968 and 2015 to characterize the field and describe changes. The team found that, despite its episodic nature, oil spill research is a rapidly expanding field with a growth rate greater than science as a whole. Research attention shifted dramatically to the Gulf of Mexico following Deepwater Horizon, rising from 2% of studies in 2004-2008 to 61% in 2014-2015, making Deepwater Horizon the most studied oil spill. The analyses provided insights into research trends and gaps, particularly a long-

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